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214: Losing Identity Through Disease

Transcript of Episode 214: Losing Identity Through Disease

With Dr. Daniel Pompa and Dr. Chris Zaino

Dr. Pompa:
Dr. Pompa here with one of actually my very good friends who if I threw—well, I guess I'd have to drive a golf ball, but I can definitely hit his house. We actually live in the same neighborhood, but that's a new thing because Dr. Chris Zaino just moved to Park City, Utah. He is in fact, my neighbor. Chris and his wife Whitney are very good friends of ours. He is a hero in my world. You're going to hear more on this show how you can tap into your inner hero because we all have one. When we don't understand it, we don't see it, or even get trapped in false identity. It can affect our life, even our health. We've got a lot to talk about on this show. This is a definite show that you're going to go from here to here because that's Chris's expert. Chris, look, you've been on the show before. Welcome to the show, but this is your second show you've done on. Welcome, Chris.

Dr. Zaino:
Thanks so much, Dan. I appreciate you.

Dr. Pompa:
Dr. Chris Zaino is a Chiropractor. I don't want to say it in a negative way to any chiropractor, but I want to say more than a chiropractor in the sense that he has been one of the most, if not most successful chiropractors on the planet really. He really has been. He's still doing chiropractic care, but he's moved beyond in the sense of really mindset. This has become an area that he's training doctors around the country, as well folks like you that are also listening. We're going to talk more about that. Chris, many people maybe didn't see the last show that I did. We talked about Mr. Universe, which you were Mr. Natural Universe. Yeah, give me those guns, man. There you go. I won't make him take his shirt off or anything. By the way, those arms right there are literally the size of my thighs. That means I have pretty damn big thighs. I'm telling you, this guy is a monster.

Dr. Zaino:
I don't know if that's a compliment or insult, Dan.

Dr. Pompa:
That's a compliment, bro.

Dr. Zaino:
All that fasting.

Dr. Pompa:
Yeah, but anyways, Chris has a lot to share here. Chris, tell people your story because they may not have tuned in. I said you were Mr. Natural Universe in the past. You've done some amazing things, but really what drove you, why you're sitting in front of me right now is because you had your own story. Recently, I was able to sit down and even talk to your mom over dinner about your story. It really re-shook me of everything you and your family have been through. Tell a little bit about that for those that haven't heard it.

Dr. Zaino:
1998, won Mr. America. Let's set up the picture here. Look good, feel good, cover of the magazines, everything's great. I was the personal trainer. I worked for some of the Orlando Magic players. Universal Studios Florida, I worked on the set with Hercules and Xena Warrior Princess if you guys remember those shows. They would film in New Zealand and do also parts in Universal Studios Florida. Internet was getting big, so I started writing for internet, and doing online magazines, cover magazines. I was jamming. It was just a great entrepreneurship ride. At 26, I met Whitney, my wife. We got married. Six months into our marriage, I started going to the bathroom a lot. Just started getting worse and worse. Then I’m starting to bleed every time I go to the bathroom. That's getting 10, 15 times a day. Then I play Google MD. I go online and I type in blood in stool. It says cancer. I'm thinking man, I lost my dad at 21 of cancer. My grandfather, I never met due to cancer. I just hit escape. I was just in denial, forget it, not going to think about it. I hid it from everybody, but when you're bleeding 15 times a day, getting worse and worse—

Dr. Pompa:
They're all going to know.

Dr. Zaino:
Yeah, right. Then I lose my bowels in public at a TJ Maxx because the bathrooms were locked, and I couldn't hold my bowels anymore. That was the day I found out I had an incurable terminal disease called ulcerative colitis, autoimmune disease. I was put on heavy drugs like Prednisone and another drug that gave me hepatitis. That's how harsh the drug was. I had medically induced hepatitis, ulcerative colitis. Worse and worse; went to Dallas, Texas to the best in the world, billion-dollar facility. They put me on low dose chemo, Remicade infusions, Interferon shots, three different organ rejection medications. My immune system was shot, so I had to wear a mask everywhere I went. Nothing worked; 230 pounds all the way down to 158 pounds in about four months. The only option was surgery that would leave me—I would be sterile. I would be four grand worth of drugs for the rest of my life. Still an 80% chance of cancer, multiple surgeries after that. We had about $250,000 in debt up to this point. That was the only option they had. I was legit. I took the drugs when they told me to. I was disciplined.

Dr. Pompa:
Oh yeah, you're disciplined, man.

Dr. Zaino:
Yeah, so that was it. I flew home to see my mom, who already lost two sons. I had a brother who died of a freak accident. Then I had a brother die of a heroin overdose that my mom found. She found him. She lost my dad. This is a woman who lost everything in her life and this is son number three that's happening. I went home to see my mom. All the prayer emails that went out. Everybody's hey, hope the surgery goes well. Then my anatomy teacher from 10th grade emailed my mom. Says, “Listen, I want to see Chris when he gets home.” I fly home. I'm wearing the mask. There's Dr. [Balm]. He's like, “Listen, I need you to go see my doctor. He’s a Corrective Care Chiropractor who will change your life.”

Dr. Pompa:
My what?

Dr. Zaino:
[It was so] thorough, dude. It's like what's a dude who taped my ankles up and stretched my hamstrings—because that's all I thought chiropractic was—going to anything for incurable auto—ridiculous. There was just no connection. I said, “I appreciate you. Thank you so much, but I've tried everything.” I did; I tried everything.

Dr. Pompa:
Yeah, I'm sure.

Dr. Zaino:
In the journey, if you're listening to this right—whether you be a doctor, or whether you're a patient listening to this now, and you're going through something, and it's tough. There's always people, and it might be this podcast, that they come into your life, and it might be for a day, a week, or a lifetime. They come into your life and they may say something that shifts your perspective that could change everything. My anatomy teacher says, “No, you didn't try everything.” He goes, “Because if you tried everything, you would have had your health.” Man, he woke me up out of a solid belief that I did it all. I'm like oh my God, he's right that I didn't try everything. I went to see this guy, Dr. Roger Romano. Dan, you know Roger.

Dr. Pompa:
Yeah.

Dr. Zaino:
He sat me down. He taught me everything we know. We all knew. We all took the test in biology. Your brain controls everything. Yes, there's a spine, the spinal cord. Yeah, 100% sense. When I went back there, I looked at my examinations. He took pictures of my spine that no one did. My lower spine, all those nerve roots that go to the organs, it was destroyed. It was trashed, but I never had pain. This first bone underneath your skull that protects your brain stem, there was 50% pressure on that. That goes to all your autonomic nervous system. I saw blind spots that I never knew about. I realized in the moment, health was not how I looked or how I felt. We miss cancer and heart disease because we go on how we look or feel. I saw the blind spot and that was it. Here's another thing. Here's another person in my life, Dan, that said something that shifted my perspective. I told him, “Okay, listen, when am I going to get better?” If you're listening to this right now and you have anything going on, and Dan, when you were not going through a good time, all you wanted to do was be what?

Dr. Pompa:
Well.

Dr. Zaino:
I want to be well. I don't care. When am I going to get better because all I was given my doctors is false expectations. Once we give you this drug; oh no, okay. We'll switch to this drug; oh no, okay. On down the line, baiting me; but once we take out your colon. I'm like, “Dude, when am I going to get better?” This is what he said. He goes, “As long as there's interference in your nervous system that controls all function, your body is not in the environment to be able to heal itself.” Watch how he puts the responsibility on me. He goes, “But when you choose to take care of your problem that you have that’s affecting your life, then your body will be able to be in the environment to be able to heal itself once again.” He goes, “But the day and the hour you're asking me,” He's like, “That's not between me.” He goes, “That's between you, your body, and God.” He goes, “But I'll tell you what, you will get well if you don't quit on yourself.”

It was the most honest answer anybody gave me. I'm so glad he set it up. How many people on this line, you're sitting there, and you're like you know what? I've been listening to this podcast for two months and I'm not any better. Like I'm going to give it one month. I'm going to try it for two months. We put this expectation. I'm like where did you get one month at? I feel like one month is enough time, work, and money that I should see something. We put these false expectations. This trying it, if you try something, you're surely to fail on that. Here's another thing. We start healing the body, you will still see the manifestation of this experience like I call it or disease process. I'm bleeding blood every single day. Even though I'm correcting my spine and correcting the cause: one week, blood; two weeks, blood. I know it's difficult in the reality to say, “I still see the manifestation of what I don't want.” Then you start to get doubt. Is this working? You start getting nervous. Then three months later, I'm off half the drugs. Then five months later, I'm off all the drugs. Then seven months later, all the blood had stopped, and my body healed itself from an incurable terminal autoimmune disease called ulcerative colitis. That was 16 years ago.

Dr. Pompa:
Yeah, it's about removing the interference.

Dr. Zaino:
Right.

Dr. Pompa:
I hope everybody here's that. We preach on that on this show, physical -inaudible-.

Dr. Zaino:
Remember, what Dr. Pompa said was right. It's about removing the interference. There's multiple avenues of interference. Chiropractic for me, the nervous system, that is where I saw a blind spot of interference, but like Dr. Dan talks, there's toxicity. Dr. Dan is an expert on all the blind spots and interferences that we don't necessarily feel but are building up in our bodies causing disease. Then we think we're a victim, or we have bad luck, or bad genes. Interference is the key.

Dr. Pompa:
I just had a conversation with a client. It was that very conversation. Many doctors giving many different supplements. She went from the meds to the supplements. I said, “Look, it's about not adding another pill, vitamin, although those things can be necessary. You still haven't been upstream and found the cause or the factor.” Any time I see an incurable or a chronic disease, and someone still doesn't feel well, I know there's something still upstream: physical, chemical, emotional, subluxation, as you talked about. It's up there. The only way to get well is to remove it.

Alright, let's shift gears. That's your story, man. That's why both of us are here, man, because we removed the interference. No doubt, we got better. That alone encourages everybody. I'm very selective, Chris, even the clients or the doctors that I take on to coach because there's something about identifying with an illness. There's something about identifying with where you are in your life that I feel I can't help them. I've done this for almost 20 years. It's taken me awhile to realize that I can't help everyone. Boy, when I came out of school, man, I thought I was just going to help the whole world. All I needed to do was convince somebody or make them do what I do. It's not the case. I love that even in my own family, but I'm a fixer, man. It's like dang it if you'd just do this. I learned that some people are stuck in a certain identity. Talk about what you're doing now. You call your program the Hero Program. Talk about that. It falls into exactly what I just talked about. Help them.

Dr. Zaino:
The I Am Hero Project, I think it’s, Dan—talking to the doctors and the patients right here. In 2005, when I went through this experience, then I'm like—it was an unknown. Dr. Dan, everybody, if you're listening right now, even the doctors, your stories to get where you are, we never plan this. Dr. Dan never planned on getting heavy metal toxicity. I never planned of getting ulcerative—we didn't plan it, but it's what made us. It was an unknown that we never planned, but the unknown drove me from this into okay, I know what health is. Yes, now I must become a chiropractor because this is clearly my purpose. It's where you feel called or chosen to do. We open up our practice in 2005. Last, 12, 13 years, became the largest clinic in the history of my entire profession helping over 17,000 patients, and affecting hundreds and thousands, if not millions of people around the world with helping other doctors. Dr. Dan, that's what happened. Things are doing good. I'm living this purpose. Everything is going well. I'm checking off the boxes. Docs, or even people listening right now, I checked off the box. I’m married, check. Healthy kids, check. Got my health, check. Financial security, check. Time to do what I want, check. It's all there. I checked off all the boxes, but now there's this thing inside me where it's a silent conversation I'm having. I'm feeling a little depressed. I'm feeling unfulfilled. I'm feeling numb. I'm feeling disengaged. I'm thinking maybe is this a midlife crisis? I'm 39. Did I peak like a boxer? My practice was coming down a little bit because I was comfortable. I was getting civilized. No one knew this.

Again, I was keeping it inside. It's funny how I'm just realizing now, but when I'm talking to you Dr. Dan, that's my MO a little bit. When I was sick, I didn't tell anybody. I realize now I was going through this pain on the inside and I just didn't want to tell anybody, but you can't hide it. You’re becoming disengaged and numb with my patients. I'm becoming disengaged and numb at home. There was a day that your kids point it out to you. I'm sitting in my office, Dr. Dan. In the other room, I hear Justice, my son, my 11-year-old now. He goes, “Mommy, what happened to daddy?” Listen, if you're listening right now, and you can't see my face, it's like your kids know. They sense the pain. They knew something was wrong. I couldn't hide it anymore. In that moment, I realized I kept -inaudible- question, why am I doing this? We could sit here, Dr. Dan, and say well, we want to help people. Yes, of course. We want to see people live their potential, yes. My deeper why, my deeper truth, or who I was, I couldn't really nail it until one day I realized that I just wanted to be admired for achieving great things and contributing to the world in a way its never seen before. That's what I wanted. That was the truth. I don't care if it sounds selfish because it's the only thing that really softened those callouses. Dr. Dan, working with patients, I will tell you, when you're a doctor, we take every patient interaction personally.

Dr. Pompa:
We do.

Dr. Zaino:
I can't serve and give my whole life to see someone get better, and not—I can't care and not care at the same time. You know, Dr. Dan, through especially chiropractic and teaching the message, it's like you heart gets callused because I allow it to from patients. You would see them get help. Then you would see them go back to the same death equation that got them here in the first place. You know what? It would sting. It would hurt. It was like did I help them? I realized that's always what I wanted, but I had this callus. I looked to the definitions of admired, and achieve, and contribution. On my phone, I'm doing it. Then I see this word comes up. It's the definition of hero. Like oh yeah, a hero. I looked into that. It said a hero is one who is admired and idealized for contribution, amazing achievement, courage, and nobility. I'm like oh my God. That's a great purpose statement. It's what I would love to do. Then I was remembered and reminded that all of us have a theme. Looking back at our lives, you will see a theme that was always there that you really didn't notice. Looking back, it reminded me, well wait a second, I was the kid in the superhero pajamas, or when my son was in superhero pajamas. I worked out to be strong, and feel like a hero, and look like a hero, and winning Mr. Hero, Mr. Universe. We beat the life-threatening terminal disease. Beat that to later on become a doctor to go save lives.
If you're a doctor on here, I had the achievements. I had the contributions to the public. One thing I didn't have, Dr. Dan, was I didn't have the courage to really allow myself to truly become who I was really deeply created to be. I realized that I'd taken down a secret identity. Even that I looked successful on the outside and had the Lamborghini, which all the blessings, but I had taken on a secret identity. It was just a less then, water downed version of our truth because I'd found my identity in my job as a doctor, and not in who I was created and destined to be. For me to extend the reach, and contribute to the world I'd never seen before, even outside the health and wellness field, it meant that I'd leave the comfort zone of what I knew I was good at. If I left that zone Dr. Dan, I just got scared. I shrunk and I mourned. When you realize you're living half your life or half your potential, the other half of your potential and life will torment you. If you're listening right now, you really not depressed. You're not numb. You're not burnt out. I found I was just grieving my potential. I was grieving who I was really created to be. In that moment, I decided to create the I Am Hero Project. Dr. Dan, you were there when first—we were in the kitchen. I was crying because it was just—

Dr. Pompa:
Yeah, I watched its birth. I really did.

Dr. Zaino:
When you're going through life, if you guys are listening, there's never an ending. Meaning, you perceive there's an end of a relationship, or an end of your health, or an end of something, a career. There's never an end. It's an evolvement. Dr. Dan, I felt like there was an end of something, but you and Warren helped me realize, no, it's an evolving. Dr. Dan, when you went through in your life multiple—it's easy to say well, it was an end to something. When now you look back down, it was an evolving.

Dr. Pompa:
Absolutely.

Dr. Zaino:
It's very tough. It's the caterpillar. Like the caterpillar, I could sit here and say I want to crawl on the ground. I want to crawl in the dirt. I want to eat crap off the ground. Now, when we're butterflies, it's different. We fly now. We see the world differently. If the butterfly just focused on man, I wish I was on the ground again. It's an evolution where we need to allow ourselves to let life evolve us to that next thing that we were created for. That’s the hero.

Dr. Pompa:
Yeah, let's pull back because now you're helping people with this. This is very important as far as your happiness in life. To you your point, if you have developed this false identity, which many of us do at different times of our life, that can be leading to an unhappy life, not a fulfilled life. Even these identities keep us in our illness perhaps and from healing. Talk about some of that because there's people watching this that are identifying with their illness. I said, “those are the people I avoid taking on even as my own clients.” Even doctors who say hey, I want my life to go from here to here. My practice, I want to be fulfilled. I see a certain person who's identified with where they are in life, a certain thing. That's that false identity you're talking about. Apply it now to how this can transform their life.

Dr. Zaino:
A lot of times, when a disease strikes, you hear people say—they actually put the word my in front of it. It’s my, name the disease. You personify that disease. You see the disease as becoming a victim; that this is now your thing.

Dr. Pompa:
Or I am. I am a thyroid patient. I am a thyroid person. I am a diabetic. I want you to know that I am. That's a big deal.

Dr. Zaino:
You're so right, Dr. Dan. I call my program I Am Hero. A lot of people get a little offended by the I am because they associate it with, of course, God, and the ultimate truth. The thing is, I'm like well, aren't people using that? Like you said, I am sick. I am fat. I am this. I am tired. You're using it every day. You’re speaking it into existence because you're personifying this experience. I know it sucks right now if you're going through disease or crisis, but understand, what if this was an experience to a purification process to where it creates this journey of unknowns and experiences. See, it's contrasts, Dr. Dan. Without your issues right now, you wouldn't have contrasts. Right now, everybody who's sick, they guarantee—I know you're very clear on what you don't want, right? Now, you're clear. I definitely don't want this anymore. When you're clear on what you don't want, it automatically sends another focus on well, I know now what I do want. I want to be well. Not that I don't want to be sick. I want to be well. It actually starts to clarify your true desires of your heart. We see that as a disease and being a victim, but we’ve got to actually see it as this is an experience I'm going through to help define my journey or what I'm going through, and build resilience, or build something where it strengths your discipline, or maybe it puts you in a vibe to start making changes you know you should have made.

I had a really good friend of mine, and he beat cancer. He was a doctor, too. He was a chiropractor. The day he was diagnosed with colon cancer, he went back to the office. His patients were like—and he was smiling. His patients are like, well, you're happy today. He wouldn't tell them what was going on. He's like yeah, I'm happy today because today I really decided I need to make some changes. He saw it as the ability and the opportunity to start to making changes he should have made a long time ago. He beat it because it was just the fact he saw it as this is an experience I'm about to go through that's going to really create—listen, guys, if you're listening right now, words don't change peoples' lives, experiences do.

Dr. Pompa:
Chris, what are some of the things that cause us to set up these false identities? How can we avoid them? How to get out of it?

Dr. Zaino:
Dr. Dan, you have kids, and if you're listening to kids out here, if you're a parent you'll get this really quick. I have a 5 and 11-year-old. When you look at kids, they are optimistic. They have huge imaginations. They're so playful. They're very faithful. They're very self-confident. They have pride. They have ego. They're proud of themselves. They're optimistic. They live in linear time. No, they live in vertical time. They're just about now. They don't live in the past or the present. When do you want to go to the park? Now. Is it now? Is it now? They are relentless. My kids have closed me 100% of the time. They're closers. They're very focused. They're playful. They're loving, man. They forgive. The number one question our kids ask us when we tell them to do something is what? Why. When they ask why because they're trying to make their own truths. I remember one day, I said I wish—listen to this error in my judgment. I said I wish I had those qualities because I could make a better impact. I could be a better doctor. I could do more. I was saying I wish I had those qualities, but then I realized—

Dr. Pompa:
You do.

Dr. Zaino:
Oh my God, that was always me. My kids never went to an Anthony Robbins Seminar. They didn't spend a dollar in personal development. They've never heard of -inaudible-. I realized in that moment, my epiphany is that all of us were innately born with those amazing qualities. Between then and 40, I call it through teachers, preachers, dogmas, belief systems, society, where we're told what to do and what to think. When that kids wants to express himself and raise his hand. They’re said, “Be quiet unless you're called on.” All of society, it blinds us of our vision and removes our remission to really truly express who God created us to be. We conform. We conform to fit in. We put on this fake suit. We go by the checklist of what other people want for our lives or what the status quo wants for our us. We start leaving out other people's values. I need to be a doctor. I need to go to this school, that school. Then we put on this secret identity just to conform and fit in. Then we think that—huh?

Dr. Pompa:
I don't want to interrupt you, but I want to know how they break out.

Dr. Zaino:
Yeah, and so the breakout is this. You could choose to live in the comfort and the torment of that secret identity or there comes a day—and I really believe there's this, Dr. Dan. Society really trains us—as a kid, we love uncertainty. We love the unknowns. We're adventurous. What's under that rock. What's in there? What's that button? We're curious. As we're being raised, we're taught to be—it's really to control us and to conform us. We're taught to stay in certainty and comfortable. Such as this, we know after first grade, there's second, then there's third, then there's fourth. Then we know there's middle school. Then we know there's high school. Then we're taught after high school, everybody goes? College, it's certain. Then we know after college, we need to get some career. Then we know hey, before 30—especially women, they're taught their babies would be birth defects after 30. Isn't that ridiculous? Women would start to feel, hey, I'm getting pressure. I need to get married now. Unfortunately, between 27 and 30 when the pressure is on, guys and girls, they would actually start to make that relationship they're in fit because it's time, when maybe it wasn't the right relationship. Then they get married. Then after you get married, you've got to do what? You've got to have kids.

By your mid-30s, where people call it a mid-life crisis, it's not a mid-life crisis. It's because you checked off the boxes of life. Like hey, you're there. Then you actually have time to look in the mirror. When you look in the mirror, you don't even know who you are anymore. You're [unidentified] job with great benefits. You don't like what you do. Your health is just -inaudible- all these other things just to get some distraction from your life. You realize you're not happy because you lived a life that everybody else wanted you to live. Then that's the day Dr. -inaudible-. You don't know who you are anymore, and you have to make a decision. Look the other way and just be comfortable or are you going to go to the very uncomfortable where you’re actually reintroducing yourself to who you are. It's like I had to look into the mirror and say, this person in the mirrors is all -inaudible- right now and is the only one that's going to help me through this. I traduced to myself, but it's tough to build a relationship with yourself when you [were living] something that wasn't you for such a long time. It was really reconnecting and remembering who that little kid was again and becoming childlike.

Dr. Pompa:
Yeah, I want you to speak to people who are stuck in their illness. Matter of fact, identifying with it. Alright, so I can spot these people. I know that they're—I made up a word, they're not helpable. I have a brief conversation with someone before I take them on. I'm looking for certain things, certain things they say. It basically shows that they become not helpable because this is a safe zone. Believe it or not, they would say Chris—and here's my fear. Most people watch this say well, that's not me because it's hard to identify yourself when you’re in it. It becomes safer and that's what you were talking about. It becomes safer literally to stay sick, as opposed to visualizing yourself living a well life. We can't almost even visualize that self. Speak to those people watching this because believe me, there's many of them.

Dr. Zaino:
Yeah, that's so right. It could be on—you're right, Dr. Dan. You don't see it because of the subconscious. A lot of times when you're sick, let me tell you, when you get sick, that's a good way to get a lot of good attention. You get care and love from people outside of you. All of a sudden, they care for you. They love you. They're going to pray for you. You're getting this wonderful attention that maybe you yearn for. Sometimes, the person thinks if I get healthy, I lose this significance. I lose this love. That's wanting to keep your sickness. We call that the emotional subluxation right there. Let me tell you. I want to just speak to that the feelings and mourning of your health is normal. There's absolutely nothing to—don't let anybody tell you your abnormal about that. Having good days and bad days is normal.

Dr. Pompa:
Totally.

Dr. Zaino:
I get it to where—when I had the best doctors in the world tell me this is the only option, I believed that was the only option. I accepted it. Like I say, it took someone to tell me something that just shifted my perspective. Like I say, that's the thing. We're not going from 0 to 100. We just need to look—if you're listening right now, here's the way out. You might be looking for 100% miracle. I'm believing for that. I'm believing for your victory on that. Here's the thing. Instead of going for the 100% miracle, all I want you to do is what is the next [easy] logical step. It might be going from hopelessness, I’m a victim to maybe I'll look into that doctor. Just a little bit better feeling. Next logical step, maybe I'll start switching out the things I eat, or maybe I'll start eliminating some of these things right now. I'll just do that one thing. Then it's the next logical step. I know in the moment, you want it gone tomorrow, but understand what is this next logical step. Not just tactical like a lot of the things that Dr. Dan recommends, but actually emotional. Okay, well, I'm not really a victim because hey listen, I have thyroid disease. Have other people cured themselves of that? Absolutely. Boom; see, now you feel a little bit better. You're not a victim. Maybe there's a little bit of hope. Some people have done that before. Okay, so there's a chance that I could do that. Because you feel so bad, you're such a victim, and your thoughts are in—the worst place to be is powerless, or apathy, and indifference. You’re vibrating on such a low level, you can't get up here. We just got to get you one level up.

Dr. Pompa:
One step at a time. I did the same thing. Let me personalize this.

Dr. Zaino:
Yeah, do that. Dr. Dan, you're out. If Dr. Dan didn't tell you this, as a chiropractor, it's very physical. Imagine Dr. Dan, he would adjust somebody, and then have to go lay down after 15 seconds of physical activity. You're there, Dr. Dan. You're in the back laying down. At the same time, praying no one comes in, but then you put on the face and the fake smile. I know a lot of you guys put on that fake smile because you're suffering. In that moment, Dr. Dan, you’re thinking what's the next logical step from that to just get an inch forward? How did you do that?

Dr. Pompa:
There's a good example here because I became chemically sensitive, massively where my life was so bad. I'd get behind a truck with diesel and I'd be wiped out. It would ruin my whole day. Or sitting next to somebody with perfume or walking in a room that had some mold or air fresheners. It would wipe me out for days oftentimes. I went to the most logical thing. I became an avoidance, which is logical, and true. I believe to some degree when you're getting well in that state, you have to avoid, but it became a survival mechanism for me. It became who I was. It became something that made me feel good at the end of the day when I avoided things. Your body, we set up these neurological patterns. The only example I can give people is I did get bit by a chow at one point. I literally would avoid chows. If I saw one, I'd cross the street because it became something that would put me into this survival mechanism. I felt my adrenaline go up. My heart rate would go up. Why? Because my body wanted to survive another dog bit. If the chow came, I either fought or flight. No matter what, it was preparing me for that. That’s exactly what was happening with me with the chemicals. My body new that these toxins were so overwhelming because my bucket was so full, that it set up a neurological pattern of releasing certain chemicals like adrenaline, cortisol. Inflammatory response would happen in my body with the smallest whiff of one chemical. Here's the problem. I got my bucket unloaded and I became healthy. The problem was my body was neurologically running down that same pattern. That happens in every area of our life. I'm using this as my story.

What you're saying is what I had to do. All of a sudden, I had to realize this has become my life. This has become what makes me feel good at the end of the day when I'm avoiding and this and that. It literally became who I was. It became part of my identity. I had to take it one step at a time. I remember the day I was at the gas station. I would always make sure that I was at the right place, so the wind wouldn't blow it. I said, “No, not today.” I said, “You know what? This is going to be my victory today. My victory is not going to be avoidance. My victory is going to be I'm going to stand here and smell the gas. I'm going to tell myself how strong it's making me, instead of how it's devastating me.” I had a little victory. I felt it. I was like you know what? I can deal with this. Then it was the next. Then it was the next thing. I literally had to reframe my whole life because I knew my body was well. My body didn't need to save my life anymore. Our bodies will do everything to save its life. It didn't need it. I had to tell it I'm okay now. Thank you for serving me, and you served me well because when I was sick, it needed to do that, and it was doing me well. Now, it was serving me now so well and I had to tell it that. It was a lot of self-talk, but it was a lot of those steps that you're talking about. One little thing at a time. One victory at a time. All of a sudden, my day then, became about those victories instead of the avoidance victories. That's my personal experience with this, Chris. I had to change who I was, man. I did.

Dr. Zaino:
If you're listening to this, you're so right because I get—Dr. Dan's right, which is I could tactically do something that's just that next step, which is good. That's the actual doing. Like Dr. Dan said, if the shift doesn't happen emotionally, mind, body, and future—then I could take something, or do something different in my life. You're right, if I still had that same illogical pathway going on. Another thing, and I don't recommend you stay here long, but it may be just the very next step you guys need if you're sitting there and you feel hopeless, apathetic, or indifferent. Actually, a level that's one step above that, which is where you want to go, is anger. Anger, there's a little bit of self-empowerment. Did you notice when Dr. Dan's like you know what? Not today. He got pissed. Sorry, not today. I'm going to stand in front of that freaking gas. It's going to suck. My body might be rocked, but I'm like no. A little bit of anger, gave him a little bit of drive and power to move forward. Now, he didn't stay there. I guarantee he did that and what did it do to him? It brought his confidence up another level. See, it created momentum. Dr. Dan, when you're indifferent, when you're victimized, when you're in apathy, there's zero momentum. It's like a stone. How do we get a boulder rolling? Like I say, sometimes a little anger gets it going. Navy Seals do that, those guys who are freezing in the water. They’re crying. They're getting scared. They tell them, tunnel it into anger because they know it's just the next level up. Then they build confidence. I can do this. This isn't as cold. Dr. Dan, good we're having those situations. Then explain to people when they get another— a down day.

Dr. Pompa:
Yeah, it’s going to happen.

Dr. Zaino:
It's not ascending straight up. It's literally zigzagging or up and down like a sign wave. I really think what that's doing is, those rough days—I really used, Dr. Dan, I believe you did too on a level, is I used my emotional guidance system. The days when I knew I was feeling bad, instead of saying I'm feeling bad, I felt I'm thinking in the wrong direction. This is not getting me there. It was just creating more contrast. I would say I'm getting scared again. I'm getting worried again. Actually, I was going in the pattern like the survival mode again. When you're scared, and when you're in panic, you can't hold that and hold hope at the same time. It's the next step level in thinking. That's where Dr. Dan would be like okay, let's [go]. Dr. Dan, you had some good days. Now, on those bad days—and they know you used prayer. We know that. Explain to us, on those bad days, what were the thing—was it something that you just—those bad days came and went? You just maybe sat in it and let it take its course or where there's actually something that you would do to recognize them and get out of it? How was that?

Dr. Pompa:
One the bad days, I would evaluate my thinking in that moment. I would say okay, how—I would try and change my belief or my premise in the moment because that's going to change your language. That's going to change your actions. That's going to change your destiny. I would say to myself, okay, how can I think about this different? I would evaluate how am I thinking about my situation right now. I would say how can I ask myself a new question. I'm asking myself questions. I'm feeling certain feelings. I automatically say, how do I feel right now. What questions am I asking myself or concerned about and how can I change that. That's what I did because you have to take, like I said, every situation one at a time and say what is my thought. What is my belief right now? What am I thinking? What new question do I have to ask myself? What new thought do I have to have about the situation? Then miraculously, even the words will start to change. Your thoughts change. Your words change. Your life starts to change.

Dr. Zaino:
Dr. Dan, I just got great download when you were talking. You just cleared it for me. We want to get better when? Quick. I'm about to tell you something that is actually a quicker road, but you got to see how I'm taking it. Let's say there's an emotional journey—there's emotional action and journey, and there's physical action and journey. The body's organic and will take time. There's always time for the process of healing. The emotional journey Dr. Dan just went through, that is a quicker action step than the actual physical manifestation of getting well. In that moment, feeling bad, he took an emotional action and emotional journey. You could get quicker results emotionally than you would physically.

Dr. Pompa:
True.

Dr. Zaino:
Just think of [the best]. If you want results quick, it's like you're looking for this physical manifestation to be quick. It is happening quick, not on your terms of course, but you could get there quicker through getting that emotional journey or emotional action first because you'll feel better or get better results quicker as this—to keep it as the physical manifestation of healing is happening. The body heals organically. Dr. Dan could tell you the billions of processes that are having to coordinate like a symphony to detox, to do all these things. That whole healing process is mind-boggling and it does take time, but the emotional change in action can happen very quickly.

Dr. Pompa:
Let me tell you something. We just got done with the Olympics. If you watch the skiers, if you watched all of them, Lindsey Vonn, all of them, they had this thing that they were all doing like this. They had their eyes closed and they were doing this thing. What they were doing is visualizing themselves going down the course. That's why they inspect the course first. They go down and they look at every bend. They know and then they see that bend. They're doing their thing. They're doing their thing because the emotion will move the physical. The emotion is the softening point. The coaches have trained them that if you can't see yourself emotionally getting well or going around at that certain rate, then the physical will follow. Oftentimes, we—athletes even—have certain fears. The coaches, a good coach is going to bring you to those fears. Change the way you think about the fears. Then visualize yourself not fearing. Visualize yourself getting well. Visualize yourself going around the turn. You see these athletes doing this to be the best of the best.

You have to apply the same darn thing in your bad days to have a better day, your better days to have perfect days. You have to apply—this is first. Then the body follows. If we want to bring the physical part all the way down to the cellular level—this is Cellular Healing TV after all. Bruce Lipton proved that our thoughts create. Our thoughts, our beliefs, our thoughts create even like I said the way we speak. That creates our actions. Actions become habits. Habits become who we become. That becomes our destiny. When we say gosh, why do I do this? Why can't I get well? We're down here in the physical, but it does start here, just like the athletes. This drives our self-function; it can. If ourselves aren't detoxing properly, maybe just maybe, it's our thoughts. I would say maybe; it's a part of it. The emotion moves before the physical. I think that was well said.

Dr. Zaino:
Really, what is a belief? A belief is a thought about something you have over and over again. It's your repetitive thought about something that really creates this belief that you have. It becomes your truth because it's the thought you have over and over again, but it may not be the truth. Such as the person who says they're sick or they're a victim of that because that's the thoughts they're having over and over again; therefore, becoming a belief of that.

Dr. Pompa:
It's funny because I was just pulling some notes out because I'm doing a lecture. You all have to hear this because you have to understand how this affects you. It's your DNA. This is what Bruce Lipton says. “Your beliefs become your thoughts.” That's your subconscious. That's your recorder. That's what drives every physiology in your body, your health, everything, who you become. Those thoughts then become our words. That's why I always tell my children, and so do you, it’s like, “Watch what you speak because that will also feedback into that subconscious and you become that. Now, watch what happens. Your words become your actions. Your actions become habits. Habits become your values.” That's the whole new identity for that sake. Then the values become your destiny. Now, you're solidly in a new person.

Here's what he teaches. What happens is that actually feeds directly into your DNA. Then your DNA tells something called RNA. RNA carries a message and you develop proteins. Your very being of who we are, us, is proteins. Your hormones are proteins. Your neurotransmitters, how your brain works, are proteins, skins, muscle. Your DNA is literally controlled first by your thoughts, your beliefs I should say. That whole pattern. Then it changes your DNA. This is now. Your thoughts are becoming who you physically, literally are, and how you physically function. DNA, RNA, and ultimately then your proteins. It literally becomes flesh. It literally becomes action. Hormones, now it's how you feel every day. Do I feel motivated? What I'm telling you is it starts with the thoughts and then it becomes that. The athletes that are doing their thing visualizing that. That becomes a physical manifestation literally from the DNA of every cell of your body. That's some serious science folks. I'm telling you, you want to become a new you, you have to change the way you think about you. You have to become—you have to identify with your inner hero. I'm telling you, Chris; it's big stuff, man. Whether you're trying to change your success, your happiness, or your health, this principle is first.

Dr. Zaino:
Yeah, let's give everybody listening or watching a good tactical step on that because I want them to actually do something. This is something that I do that I think—it's something they could do. It keeps it in front of you. Sitting there, everybody's like well, I want to feel better. I want to get well. That's just the thought of it. That's your goal, of course. What I do is I [especially] in that state, you want to keep the victory right here all the time. When you're having a bad time, I need to create a new anchor. What I do every day, I have a little book pad. I don't want to say goals, I write my desires down every morning.

Dr. Pompa:
I like this better, yeah.

Dr. Zaino:
Meditate a little bit. Just clear my mind. I write my desires down. What I mean by desires, you're going to write down how you want to see yourself in the future. It's all the I ams. I am healthy. I am secure. I have potential. I have wonderful experiences. I write this down. This is what I want. I am here. I speak all of that, all these things. Justice and [Tidice], all the stuff about them. I write these goals down in the morning. I write my targets that would make today successful. Today, podcast with Dr. Dan, quiet time. That could be your protocols whatever you do. Then I put successes. At the end of the day, I write down my successes because I want people to see that you are winning on the daily basis. Then part of the successes are the unknowns. Here's an unknown: wow, I heard a Cellular TV today that really changed my day. It was a win. It was an unknown. Let's say you were having a rough time and you heard this message today. You're like it spoke to me in the right time. See, I want you to be aware that God is speaking to you all the time. We're looking for this audible voice. Everything is leading and guiding you in the right direction, but when we're not looking for it, or tuned in, and tapped on, then we miss it.

Dr. Pompa:
True.

Dr. Zaino:
I record, I learned this from Dr.—all these wins. All these things I didn't plan on, so I really see every day I'm winning. Literally, the universe is guiding me every day through people, and audios, and books. Then before I go to bed, I write my goals and desires down again to keep focused. The reason why you write them down is because now they start to become the lens I look through. When I'm talking to Dr. Dan, well, it's fulfilling one of my things. Look right here, one of my goals is I attract relationships that help support the manifestations of my desires. Dr. Dan is a—we have a relationship that's supporting the forward movement of our—when you write your goals down, then your whole day, you're actually aware and sensitive to those things that are working towards your desires.

Dr. Pompa:
Intention.

Dr. Zaino:
It's intention. The reason why you do this every day guys is because you keep it in front of you. Then every day these desires and goals change. You're like I don't feel like starting a podcast. You don't want to put your goals down once. You allow them to evolve. Today, after this Cellular TV, something shifted in you. You ascended. You look at things differently. Maybe your desires shifted. From a month ago, these desires and goals changed. You're allowing yourself to course correct and you’re getting very clear. When I keep these things in there, it's keeping a journal. This helps create the momentum of getting that boulder off of your chest and getting moving because you're going to say, today I feel a little bit better. Today, I started something new. A win today, I did this for myself. You start to see and focus on like Dr. Dan, the intentions that you are winning. It's tough when I think I'm in a losing battle. Everything is going to support that I'm in a losing battle because that's all I see.

Dr. Pompa:
Yeah, let's say you have a bad day. If the worst day ever at the end of the day, you're saying well, there was no victory. Say yes there was. Again, you have to change the way you think and the questions you're asking yourself. You say, yeah gosh, but what did I learn in it? Actually, one thing I learned was this. I'll telling you, if you intentionally sit down at the end of the day, you'll realize you had more victories than you thought, even in your worse day. I'll tell you what, if I didn't have bad days, I wouldn't have had great days. My bad days probably most likely lead to more information and more discovery than my great days. Matter of fact, my great days never put me in study. My great days never put me into a study that I learned something. It was my bad days every time that drove me to another level. How often did I take the time at the end of the day to identify that? I definitely could have changed my outcome or my destiny a lot sooner if I would have.

Dr. Zaino:
You have a bad day, what happens to a bad day? It humbles you. You could write down: I'm so humble for the health I will achieve. I am grateful for my health. I realize today how grateful I am for my health when I get it, or as I'm getting it, as I'm building it. The basic things you become wins. I got out of—for some of you like Dr. Dan when you were so exhausted, I got out of bed today and went here; win. I listened to the Cellular TV; win. That's a win. You heard this; win. You really start, look, I am winning daily. This lie I'm believing is—the secret identity I'm in, is lying to me. Here's the thing guys with the secret identity. You think it's just going to go away nicely. No, it's like any other animal that fights for its survival. When that animal feels it's going to die, it will fight, and give it everything it has, and claw its way because it's trying to protect its survival.

Dr. Pompa:
Until it loses hope, by the way. That's when you—

Dr. Zaino:
When you switch.

Dr. Pompa:
When you flip-flop things, you’re basically—hope’s a funny thing. Matter of fact, I'm re-reading actually Viktor Frankl, Search for Meaning in Life. An absolutely unbelievable book. If you haven't read it, it will speak to you because basically it is about that. The moment we lose hope is the moment he saw everybody dying in concentration camps. It's written from this perspective, folks. I never had a day that bad. Let me tell you something. I never had a day that bad. Yet, it was the people who held on to hope that survived. What this does, by doing this at the end of the day, the beginning and your end of your day, it not only creates hope, but it's changing you, your physiology, no doubt about it. It really sets you up for more healing, more happiness whatever it is. Listen, the same things apply if you're a doctor listening to this who want to take your practice to the next level of healing. Whatever you're doing, where ever you're stuck, man, there's people stuck all over the place because that's what we do as humans.

Dr. Zaino:
It keeps the vision because if you think about when you write down that vision or the desire of your heart, that's the spirit of you. It knows the truth. When you look at we're told—again, you've got to let go what you were told in education society. When I write my things down, it's very easy to think oh, you're just dreaming. That's delusional. See, my spirit knows the truth. My brain might be bamboozled by a reality that it thinks is there, but it's really not. That inner desire is always truth, so I write my truth down. That becomes your vision. Now, when you’re sick, you write these things down daily, so you always keep that vision in front of you. As long as that vision is there, it's like the light—it's the lighthouse. It's the beacon that's pulling you forward. Let me tell you, that vision you write down, that's what pulls you through the tough days.

Dr. Pompa:
Yep, and I tell you, vision boards are critical because it gives you a picture. Vision boards are actual pictures. You can create them on your computer, or something you literally stick to your wall, your refrigerator. Something you see every day. It's a vision of you healthy. It's a vision of the home that you desire. The vacation that you haven't been able to take with your family. It's a vision of you doing that thing that would fulfill you. That's a another just complete manifestation. It makes you so intentional. That's another suggestion I think both of us would have. I'm creating a new one, myself just for—I love to recreate this because it's another way to take me to a higher level and I'm going to take other people with me, man. That's just who I am. Same with you brother. Chris, thank you for being with us, man.

Dr. Zaino:
Yeah, it was great stuff.

Dr. Pompa:
This is going to be a big share show because I'm telling you, this applies to every one of us, no doubt, to go to whatever level you are. We become stuck, man. We've got to dig in for our inner hero. It's there somewhere. That's our most authentic self, isn't it?

Dr. Zaino:
It always is. Everybody has to understand this line. We're all in different parts of our life, but you understand we're all co-creating together. That's why you were on this line right now. We've all been through it, but we're on different chapters of the book. All the experiences are so we could help each other. It's co-creation at its finest. It is the true authentic hero. Remember, everything is working for your good. It's creating the true authentic version of you.

Dr. Pompa:
Yeah, love it, man. Great place to stop. Dr. Chris, appreciate and love you, man. Thank you.

Dr. Zaino:
No problem. I appreciate you guys so much.

Dr. Pompa:
Alright, we'll talk, man; bye.